Why Tryweryn Matters to the Other Celtic Countries

NEWS FROM THE CELTIC LEAGUE

“It happened in Wales but it could have happened anywhere that suited the expediency of the British State. The nationals of the Celtic countries were aborigines to be ignored or used!”

Tryweryn and what happened there should matter to all the Celtic countries because it is symptomatic of the contempt which the Westminster governmenthad at the time for the Celtic Nations in the 1950s and 60s.

They were places to be used and places to dump things that you did not want in your own backyard.

The opposition of ‘local people’ was immaterial even when as in Wales that opposition amounted to large public demonstrations or a fair proportion of Members of Parliament. Such opposition could be ignored or brushed aside forthe greater good of the British (for that read English) State.

In Scotland in the 1950s the UK built the Dounreay facility an experimental reactor as far away from London as possible after all if anything did go wrong there would just bea few ‘local people to be moved. Later respect for the safety of ‘local people’ was pushed to one side for the greater good when they sited the nuclear submarine bases at Holy Loch and Coulport on the Clyde again far enough away from London that if anything went wrong the consequences ‘would be manageable’.

Similarly in Cornwall they set up Nancekuke Chemical weapons manufacturing facility – it was ok to experiment in England at Porton Down –but if something went really awry best to have the main facility far away!

It wasn’t just physical infrastructure there was also indifference and bullying.

Indifference towards their gerrymandered Statelet in the North of Ireland, where the nationalist community were abused and oppressed through the fifties and sixties – that indifference eventually blew up in the face of the British State and a war that lasted over thirty years cost enumerablelives and is still, in truth, unresolved

Even the Isle of Man, a forgotten backwater, monetarily became the mouse that roared in the late sixties when British imposition of legislation and an attempt to hike defence charges stirred Manx politicians briefly from their obsequious torpor and forced profound fiscal change.

So what chance did the Tryweryn Valley have in the face of the massive inflated ego of the Westminster-Centric British State? No chance at all, its opposition was just swept aside and the village and farmsteads obliterated. It happened in Wales but it could have happened anywhere that suited the expediency of the British State. The nationals of the Celtic countries were aborigines to be ignored or used!

BERNARD MOFFATT

Issued by: The Celtic News

18/10/15

THE CELTIC LEAGUE INFORMATION SERVICE

The Celtic League established in 1961 has branches in the six Celtic Countries. It promotes cooperation between the countries and campaigns on a range ofpolitical, cultural and environmental matters. It highlights human rightsabuse, military activity and socio-economic issues

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