Hope Those Graffiti Pics Haven’t Been Shredded

NEWS FROM THE CELTIC LEAGUE

I wrote recently that the arrival of the latest colonial puppet, Richard Gozney, on the Island in April (is it the 1st) next year might lead to a resurgence of nationalism and I recalled the graffiti campaign some years ago.

https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=945860195462742&id=805941286121301

The post above contains links to news items on the campaign which was quite subtle juxtaposing the year in which British colonies became independent with their name.

The imported Chief Constable at that time referred to it as ‘criminal damage’ and I’ve no doubt that it was an annoyance to anyone whose wall was spattered but as it happens our graffiti brigade were able to have their work removed by a team of volunteers in less than a day. So no harm done.

Nonetheless that campaign and others before it like Fo Halloo and FSFO are important historical tension points in our history.

In some Celtic countries graffiti becomes almost revered as with the COFIWCH DRYWERYN slogan on the A487 in Wales which commemorates the infamous flooding of the Tryweryn valley – that gets spruced up regularly so you would think it was painted yesterday not fifty years ago (link):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Llyn_Celyn

I was thinking about this when I compiled the post earlier of government shredding machines working overtime before FOI is introduced.

I do hope the local cops who I’ve no doubt took copious photographic evidence at the time (the CC at the time, I think it was Langdon, seemed to have a right bee in his bonnet over it) have hung on to the pics and had the foresight to schedule them for deposit at MNH.

Of course if the ‘colony graffiti’ and the earlier FSFO/Fo Halloo material has been shredded already well what you can say – that would be criminal damage!
Picture: One of the signs JAMAICA 1962
BERNARD MOFFATT
Issued by: The Celtic News

27/12/15

THE CELTIC LEAGUE INFORMATION SERVICE

The Celtic League established in 1961 has branches in the six Celtic Countries. It promotes cooperation between the countries and campaigns on a range of political, cultural and environmental matters. It highlights human rights abuse, military activity and socio-economic issues

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